Reflection for Friday 12 Feb 2021



Good morning friends,


I recent days I have had two invitations from the NHS.

One, my invitation to come and receive the covid 19 vaccine, the second to come into the opticians, to have my annual eye-test. Both invitations I am more than happy to take up.


In terms of the eye-test it’s important for me because of the instance of glaucoma in our family. An eye- disease that causes loss of sight, and both my grand-father and mother became blind because of it.

My mothers’ blindness was particularly sad, because although she knew about the importance of catching the signs early so that when detected, surgery could correct, she was too afraid to ask for help. When she finally did, it was too late and she spent her latter years becoming physically more and more restricted causing much distress, for she was no longer able to do all the things she wanted to, and missed out on seeing her great grandchildren. And, she was heard often to say she wished she had taken up the offer of help from the medical professions then life would have been so different.


Her fear prevented her from getting the help she needed.


In Mark’s gospel there’s an interesting account of a blind man receiving his sight.


“Then they came to Jericho. As Jesus and his disciples, together with a large crowd, were leaving the city, a blind man, Bartimaeus (which means “son of Timaeus”), was sitting by the roadside begging. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Many rebuked him and told him to be quiet, but he shouted all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!”

Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.”

So they called to the blind man, “Cheer up! On your feet! He’s calling you.” Throwing his cloak aside, he jumped to his feet and came to Jesus.

“What do you want me to do for you?” Jesus asked him.

The blind man said, “Rabbi, I want to see.”

“Go,” said Jesus, “your faith has healed you.” Immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus along the road.” (Mark 10:46-52)


Bartimaeus was physically blind, and yet he seemed to have deep insight, for he knew who Jesus was and what he could do for him.

It wasn’t Bartimaeus who didn’t want to helped, but the crowds who were following Jesus. The onlookers told him to be quiet at first, probably thinking Jesus would not want to be bothered by the likes of him.

But Bartmaeus paid no heed and shouted all the louder.

Jesus heard him and asked the crowd to call him over, they did and Bartimeaus threw off his cloak and fell at Jesus feet.

Jesus asks the question, “What do you want me to do for you?” And without any hesitation, without any fear, the blind man asks to see. And he does!! He sees, and so do the crowd.


I am so glad this account is told, for it shows us that we should never have any fear when we approach Jesus, he invites us day in and day out to come to Him.

We should never listen to those who might try to tell us that we are not “good enough” to approach the Saviour.


Jesus never turned anyone away, and will never turn anyone away who comes to Him for help.

So, listen to the voice of Jesus today, asking you, “What do you want me to do for you?”

Tell Him, let Him reach out and touch your inmost being.

And, follow Him along the road to freedom.





God bless your day,

Elizabeth

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